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by board members. any appointments this evening? seeing none. i am pleased to introduce our elections commission report. delivered by our election commission appointee, catalina ruiz-healy. you can sit here. if you would like. >> good evening. superintendent, and new president and vice president and commissioners. thanks for having me. i was honored to receive your appointment in march, 2011, to be your appointee to the commission for the san francisco election department. you have received a memo from me. and i can go over it quickly, and i hope you had a chance to read it. but basically the city charter authorizes the election commission to supervisor the elections. and we are charged with a fairly narrow scope of work, for generally setting the department of elections and for the proper administration of the department. so the budget and we hire and fire the department of elections. so take a breath here. the way that the commission works on their on and off years. in 2011 our work focused on operations and less on policy. because we are getting ready to implement elections in the
is here at it is about our president. take back the house, elected democrats at every level of government and fight for our values for 100% of the american people. thank you. thank you, madam chair. [applause] >> thank you, secretary. the next item on the committee's agenda is the report from the credentials committee. i'd like to recognize co-chairs to give us an update on this. >> in a. >> thank you, madam chair. on the have of the rest of the potential committee we are honored to present our report. >> the credentials committee received a challenge to the election of dnc members from the state of georgia, and a challenge to the election process used in the election of dnc members from virginia. >> most of these challenges were received in a timely fashion, and reviewed by the credentials committee co-chair. after reviewing each of these challenges, the co-chairs determined that neither of the challenges have merit and the members under challenge were to comment to be properly elected members of the democratic national committee. >> with that, we now recommend to this body the adoption
the director of the department of elections or to certifying the official election of the order supervisors. districts 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11. and have been declared elected to that office. supervisor: mar, chiu, breed, campos, avalos. the second communication is a communication from the controller renewing the certification of the bond for the newly elected in the elected members of the board of supervisors. >> we will now proceed to the oath of office. >> i would like to welcome and introduce the honorable cynthia ming-mei lee, presiding judge, supuerior court of california. who will administer the oath of office to the following individuals: david campos eric mar john avaols myself mornam yee london breed. >> judge lee: good to be here. please come forward. would the supervisors being sworn in prer fer to stand? you all have to agree on. >> judge lee: would you all please raise your right hand? please state your name after "i". repeat after me. i do solemnly swear or affirm that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states. and the constitution of the state of calif
, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
bhfer you take votes right away from certain conconstituentcy to none elected officials it problematic and secondly it can be open to litigation and the purpose of this is to protect focus it will counties and the taxpayers in san francisco and this does not have any profession to the rate pairs or taxpayers of san francisco for any litigation that may come about as as a result of this amendment and i urge you to consider that before you pass this amendment and lastly, it doesn't involve all of the key stakeholders in this conversation. the city of california, has determined that the economic value of restoring hetch hetchy would be $6 billion annually to the people of california and therefore, i think that is 6 billion reasons why they are key stakeholders in this process and so, we would urge you would amend or revise or have more conversation truly about this issue by requiring that instead of providing veto power to unelect of the power on the peninsula require an elect toarl component to the region it may represent and put it directly to the voters of the from a and if you are go
mile to assure the russians about future u.s. missile defense moves. >> after my election, i will be more flexible. >> it's going to be harder this time. i don't see where u.s./russian relations can productively go. that's going to be a big problem for the president, starting, of course, with syria. but ooh ran is the even bigger issue that is undecided. we have gotten some russian help, so far on iran. but it doesn't mean we will get russian help with the next step. >> the arab spring signaled the fall of middle-east leaders with whom u.s. officials had, for 30 years, cultivated careful relationships. president obama called on hosni mubarak to step down. >> a change must take place. >> allocated u.s. resources for a no-fly zone in libbia, leading to the killing of moammar khadafy. but while calling for bashir al-assad to step down, a war continues. >> overall, president obama's legacy toward the middle-east is one of limited american activism. that is carcaturd by how we handled egypt, libya, syria, iraq. >>. >> there are unanswered questions about the investigation into the
for re-election, the president is free to pursue the agenda that will enshrine him. among america's greats were abe lincoln and thomas jefferson. for this u.s. president, the first african-american ever elected to the office, the historical legacy has already been written before he officially began his first term. four years ago, president barack obama welcomed the weight of that legacy casting himself as a blank canvas to project our lofty hopes for change and great expectations for the nation. the first item on his agenda, that bright legacy and suggested those hopes were well placed. president obama tried and succeeded where previous democratic presidents tried and failed. he enacted legislation that provided universal health care for all americans. four years after the first inauguration our lofty hopes for what was possible have been dragged back down to earth by the cold hand of reality and a republican dominated house of representatives. this time around, our great expectations may feel like managed expectations. take a look at president obama's second term official portrai
, and fighting in elections to change the supreme court. >> what would you think of having a national general assembly modeled on the original continental congress in philadelphia beginning on july 4 of 2012? coming up with a list of grievances that this assembly debated. >> lawrence blessing has talked about a new constitutional convention. i think it is early. i think it is tricky. i do not mean to sound too conservative. when you say to make a list of grievances, we could sit in this room and come up with a list of six ideas or grievances that need to be made real and lead to change. you need to find your issue, work in your community. work in the organizing around the issue. link up with groups doing work. if it is student debt, find ways to take on the banks, local legislators, and congress in the short term. is not very revolutionary. at the event we did on 9/11, i said i felt this country was in a pre-revolutionary moment. it was about a week before occupy was street launched. i believe in evolution, not revolution. >> katrina, did you read the foreign affairs article that backs up the
. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by aye or nay. i declare that the floor is open for the nomination of president for board 2013. >> i would like to nominate our current vice president, rachel norton. >> any further? if no more, i declare the nomination closed. >> commissioner norton, i would like to move that we elect commissioner norton by acclimation. that needs a second. >> second. >> any other discussion? okay, we are good. thank you very much. [applause] i have the pleasure to announce that i have been elected president of the board. [laughter] i am now declaring nominations open for the office of vice president of the board of education for the year of 2013. any nominations? commissioner mendoza. >> it would be my honor to nominate sa
is this is a real imperative. what's new, it also is now an imperative for republicans. the election results from last november made clear the republican party needs a message for latino, asian-americans and immigrant groups if they have any chance of recapturing the white house. >> scott, this is carla marinucci. what's your thoughts on this? we've seen paul ryan, marco rubio extend a hand to president obama so to speak and suggest they are ready to talk about immigration reform. what's the biggest hurdle here? >> well, i think the biggest hurdle in the end is going to be politics, of course, but the issue of citizenship. what marco rubio outlined this week and last weekend is very close to what president obama talked about in 2011. and so i think that will provide some cover for other republicans. when you've got someone like marco rubio, a rising star in the party, paul ryan, saying we're ready to do a deal here, but the devil is in the details as they always say. democrats feel very emboldened on this issue, and they're going to sort of, you know, swing for the fences. they want full legal st
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
of elected throughout the state and community leaders as well and we are hopeful that this will be a template for what wedo in this case and that we get a similar level of success to make sure had a money goes back to the people who are victim iressed and that they get the restitution that they deserve and i would like to introduce michael papist from the enter face-to-face 98 counsel because he was a big part in making sure we got our effort out to the 98 community and to make sure that borrowers who were vimsed got the restitution they deserved and we are happy he is cooperating in our effort for the next 90 days. >> p oop pennsylvania a s.-the san francisco enter fate counsel is absolutely indebted if you will forgive the pun to his city treasure her heira in this suspicious when this program started. we believe that the victims of predatory lending are sill the in in our pews and we work with faith-based organization to provide the safety yet and net and we are here today to commit ourselves again to the good work that dennis is doing and in the past, we have used our technology networ
said on national television the night -- election night of 2000 as florida was coming in that the election would be decided that night. people may remember that election was decided by the supreme court. it went on for two or three months. it ended up being decided by the governors, bush's brother, a supreme court judge chosen by his father. >>> george bush was asked if he had ever been wrong and said he could not think of a time. he is still saying that. [laughter] humble man. we are about out of time. do you have a short question? >> what is the circulation of "the nation"? >> 1.5 million readers online and 160,000 paper circulation. paul newman was a great and loyal friend and supporter. his partner in crime, robert redford, has been a supporter. we have a circle of 100 people who give each year. 30,000 associates give little each month above the subscription price in the belief it is not just a media institution but a community. there are 40 discussion groups around the country. [applause] >> these people obviously support it for what it espouses and believes in. d
elections, drowning out the voices of ordinary american citizens eager to participate in the political process. citizens united also epitomizes the so-called corporate personhood movement in which some now say the corporations are people. the fact is corporations are not people, and the constitution was never intended to give corporations the same rights as the american people. corporations don't breathe. they don't have kids, and they don't die in wars. my constituents continue to express concern about the growing influence of corporations in our political discourse. they're also demanding action on campaign finance reform because they are repulsed by the large amount of money in our campaigns. and quite frankly, they want elected officials to spend more time on policy, deliberating and debating on issues and less time dialing for dollars. unfortunately, the republican leadership in the house has failed to address these pressing issues during the past two years. they have been indifferent. we haven't had the opportunity to vote on any legislation to curb the influence of unlimited and
, the question is what urgency to do they place on that. we had an election two months ago where there were two candidates, one was more focused on cutting the deficit and reducing our long term debt and one didn't think it was a big concern. the one who didn't think it was a big concern won the election. yes, voters seem to say that is an issue they agree with, but when it came to election day two months ago that certainly wasn't one of the top issues they voted on because they voted for the candidate who wasn't embody go it. >> heather: through his actions, as well. that leads to this, how f or if it should be raised? should the debt limit be raised again, 23% say yes, but 69% don't agree with the president. they say raise it only after major cuts. there again what cuts would those be but president obama as we know he increased the debt by $6 trillion in his if you are four years. some say that administration overspent by one trillion a year every year since he's been in office. now she demanding the get ceiling to be increased again. do you think he will be listen to the 69% that say only af
for its two-time elected democratic president, to say nothing of the first african-american president, it brings together all of the best about this country. >> jennifer: you can see where they're playing from. they just had a shot of actually -- actually from inside the view of a tuba. they had a shot of them, they're up on the platform which is elevated, right. overlooking the mall. so it is a beautiful spot for them to be. right above them is where the president will take the oath. that's where all of the elected officials are seated, where they're seated as well. marine band will be playing for quite awhile here. almost an hour of the lead up to the inauguration. >> it is an aaron sorkin kind of day. west wing kind of day. a day where ritual and politics becomes an important part of keeping the democratic tradition alive. as someone who sometimes sat on the cynical side of things. clearly, it is a representation of the imperial presidency. >> jennifer: we're seeing dick durbin walking right now into the steps, as he's going up, he was obviously a lead player in so much of the putt
lincoln's election and a number of 1860 to his inauguration in march, 1861. during this time the president was pressured by republicans and democrats throughout the country to maintain the union. it's a little over an hour. >> welcome to the virtual book signing here at the abraham lincoln bookshop as always. i'm daniel weinberg and i am pleased to have you here. it is a lincoln civil war book signing at work. it's a wonderful way for you to build a first edition signed library with all of the books coming out over the next few years in the lincoln bicentennial which is upon us but also the war that follows the heels there are so many books coming out and we are going to try to weed through them and have the authors on the show so you can see the best research going and also you have to weed out others that you don't have to have always. there are too many books out there. >> i say that as a book dealer we adjust them for book signings and that is what distinguishes us. if you are watching live, we encourage you to do questions and we will try to get them on air and have them answered for
the about was re-elected so we don't have to worry about the supreme court being distorted. i do think that's the case. you know over the last couple of years, we've seen state after state introduce restrictions on a woman's right for access. so the law is in place but the states can deny access and then you have some states where there's only one clinic in the entire state that provides the service. >> john: exactly. so what do you say to your constituents who might be opposed to abortion rights who maintain that it's their right because of their beliefs be it religious or otherwise to do everything they can to chip away at these rights of women? >> well, you know, i really find it to be contradictory because the same people who are against choice also say that they are opposed to government interventions and they want government to be small. but yet they want to give government the authority to determine what a woman does with her body and to tell a doctor what a doctor does in an exam room. to me, if you were constent and you were against abortion, then why don't you provide ready access
of the election year, yet you don't have presidential candidates to have a vastly different approach to it. >> it is true that i think it is the increasingly become an issue, and the heartland of america, especially in the south. for instance in north carolina, there's been a huge increase in the latino population of north carolina, but most people don't understand how those latinos got there. it is a largely guatemalan migration, and its large the people who were recruited in the 1980's and 1990's to come and work in the textile mills of north carolina, because part of what i try to show in the book is the enormous connection between the needs of capital of american expanding industries in the u.s. and this recruitment of labor. what happened basically is in the 1980's, more salvadorans and guatemalans were flocking to the united states as a result of the civil wars and their country and repression in their country. they came here to the u.s. and there were industries that were needed for cheap labor. you have the meat packing industry in the midwest that began recruiting many mexicans to
rejectionists. >> we saw in pennsylvania there is so much of the willingness to rig the election. they know they're heading into trouble and it's almost like lebanon. you know? and when i see them doing it, we're never going to be popular again so, we're going to have to rig it so gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections? that is how bad nbc has gotten that. is their coverage. >> a couple points about this quote, unquote news network. on the gettysburg address, chris matthews has it exactly wrong. just the opposite. gettiesberg address was an attempt at healing the nation's wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech, yesterday, was a left wing declaration of war against conservative movement. so it was the opposite. as for the rigging charge this is classic msnbc. going back to 2004 with keith onerman refusing to concede ohio going to bush. this is how bizarre msnbcs now, they're saying this is -- a great conspiracy to rig elections. i don't know what they're talking about. >> oos s-. >> sean: listen this, is an extension of the obama white house, they'
, as well. this as you say was history. 16th president to win election to two consecutive terms and be sworn in. now, they have all the ceremonial swearings tomorrow. this more intimate friend in the blue room, family and close friends. amid all the constitutional moments there was also a light family moment where a dad got to talk to his daughter, take a listen. >> thank you sir. [ applause ] >> i did it. all right. thank you everybody. >> reporter: i did it, he said and sasha said you didn't mess up. vice president biden got to try this out first very early this morning. reason why it was so early is that just sotomayor had to get on to a train to go to new york city to sign her books. she was trying to get to barnes & noble this afternoon in new york city. >> gregg: you got to plug that book, that is more than the vice president of the united states. your publisher wants more book sales. [ laughter ] >> gregg: how might tomorrow's big speech by the president really set the tone and tenor for policy in his second term? >> reporter: very important. saw president bush try to do this in 2005
. in this conversation we have the rear picture -- rare picture of king advising johnson how he's going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here we go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't. because i'm going to keep on talking. at any rate a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movement and people in congress tried to put an end, finally, for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmund pet tiss bridge -- pettis bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenants started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpack -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of sherr ri
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
and for the nation that re-elected the president. i'm steve handelsman, nbc news, washington. >>> president obama never used the words "democrat" or "republican" in his second inaugural address, but his political message was crystal clear. a full-throated embrace of progressive policies, along with a directive for our leaders to spear head the challenges that define us as individuals and as a country. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare, medicaid and social security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. we will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. we, the people, still believe enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. and we must be a source of hope to the poor, the sick, the marginalized. the victims of prejudice. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. our journey is not comp
. the next two flags are the flags the u.s. adopted when the president elect's home state became part of the u.s. the middle flag represents the 50 states. president obama plus home state illinois entered the union and 18 -- in 1818, making it the 21st state to join the union. the two flags towards the center, they will display 21 stars. dole in new york, the independent line. -- joel in new york, the independent line. >> i love c-span. inauguration day is a proud day for every american, regardless of party affiliation. i want to address the first caller about poverty. i am a second-generation american, and if you cannot make in this country, you'll be doomed to failure in any other country. host: julie, salt lake city, good morning. caller: i want to thank you for taking my call. i lived in a completely republican state. thank goodness that president obama has prevailed, because i do believe that the majority of people, even though i do it in a republican state, a lot of them did vote for him. unfortunately, i wish we would get rid of the electoral vote and go to the popular vote. i
and bus ride. and started selling tickets before election day >> there's nothing like being here. i mean i could watch it on television or i could sit in one of the buildings around here and probably look out at it. it's nothing like being in there. kind of like swimming. you can think about the swimming but if you're not in the pool you really can't feel it. >> suarez: for many we spoke to, it wasn't just history but this president that brought them to washington >> we don't think we've had a president like him before or will have one in my lifetime. so it's worth it to be here to pay homage to him and to his beautiful family and to the country that elected him and to the people who elected him. we're just delighted to be a part of this. >> this is history in the making. first of all from an historical perspective who wouldn't want to be here? but more importantly for me, the whole of the obama administration is everything that i hold dear >> suarez: margaret came up with her family from north carolina. for her a second inauguration for the first black president was no less exciting, no l
, and professional that morning there's so much of this willingness to win the election by the republicans, they know they're headed into trouble. many like lebanon, take the fences down. okay, we're never going to be popular again so we're going to have to rig it. >> sean: so it's the gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections. that's how bad nbc's gotten, that's the coverage. >> a couple of points about this quote, unquote news network and this quote, unquote newsman. on the gettysburg address, chris mathews has it it exactly wrong. he has the opposite. the gettysburg address was an attempt at healing of nation' wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech yesterday was a left wing declaration of war against the movement. and it was opposite. after the rigging charge, this is classic msnbc. this goes back to 2004 keith olbermann refusing to concede ohio going to bush. i don't think they have it clear the election of 2004 yet. this is how bizarro mn sbc is and now the conspiracy to rig elections, i don't know what they're talking about. >> sean: this is an exte
, can you spell the word hypocrisy? one of the things that i noticed, i served as a field election deputy person in the -- district in the 2008 elections. the hunters point, bay view community is traditionally and historically underserved. in the branch library improvement program of the 26 libraries, who got the last library after 10 damned years? bayview hunters point. those people should not trust you as far as you throw a rock. >> getting supervisors my name is andre -- i stay in district 6. i want to mention that next month is african-american hiv awareness month. i mentioned to a couple of members of the board; we will have a little function in the front of city hall, on the seventh, i think it starts at 4:30 and then we will march. and hopefully my supervisor will speak at it. i would be happy about that. on to serious note, a lot of things are going to be slung across his room, talking about the warriors. i am supportive of the warriors. i'm quite sure that a lot of the unions are in your pockets or in somebody's pocket because when they had the press thing with the m
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 400 (some duplicates have been removed)